Frederick P. Isaac

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Articles and book information on Assyrian issues including contemporary history, experiences under Islamic rule, leadership and Assyrian aspirations to nationhood.


Indigenous Peoples

Under the Rule of Islam

 

by Frederick P. Isaac

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Indecisiveness

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The On-going Infighting
 

 

By considering the Khalipha (Successor of Muhammad) as head of the Islamic nation, and the Shari’ah Law as the only way to control the Umma Nation, little room, if at all, is left for secular reformation.

In the absence, and presumably nonexistence, of an eligible and recognised spiritual Khalipha leader, reversion to traditional Islamic rule, remains unachievable. So long as the Khilapha post remains in the void so will democracy remain absent, failing even to make a head start. Such despotic regimes are clogged in the quagmire of their own making.

Lack of civil liberty and personal choice impedes progress. Internal conflicts, corruption and violence become part of the ruling system, leading escalation of the ferocity of the conflict to outright war. The bullet instead of the ballot box becomes the rule of law. Freethinking is suppressed. Formation of voluntary institutions to promote rapprochement and social justice among citizens of diversified cultures remain non-existent or ineffective at best.

Establishment of Islamic social clubs, cultural societies, public swimming pools and entertainment centres are discouraged. Social group activities of the ethnic communities are disallowed. Formation of sports clubs, mixed cultural centres and aboriginal societies are seen as foreign and un-Islamic. The very few that exist are put under constant surveillance. Civil liberty, freedom of expression, graphic arts, figural representation and general sports activity for the female gender are considered unethical and strongly discouraged. In the turbulence of all this, the non-Muslim communities are dragged alongside the continued unrest of the Islamic masses.

Muslims live with a one-track mind, believing that their way is the only true way to salvation. Yet, they fail to manifest to the world that the methods they apply in spreading their mission are peaceful, and not by committing acts of terrorism in the name of religion through jihad, but by being open to dialogue and sharing with the rest of the religions in the good that comes out of such dialogues – to keep that which is good and discard that which is not (Na’kol Al-Lobba Wa-Narmi ‘l-Qushour).

During the reign of the Talaban, Afghanistan grew opium with the excuse that its government needed hard currency to survive. Instead of opening up to the world, it continues in its old ways of growing opium, denying female citizens education and employment. Instead of accepting change to improve its ailing economy, through freedom of the individual, freedom of expression, education and social justice, the Afghan Talaban government continues to grow opium and repress its people, plunging the country into total darkness of ignorance and deprivation. (Hiro, 1989: pp 6,12, 27, 41, 56, 122; Pryce-Jones, 1989: pp 122-123; Polk, 1991: pp 43, 48; Aburish, 1995: pp 105-106).

Relief organizations and aid agencies can only help in a limited capacity in the field of distribution of food, medicine and temporary shelter. They cannot change the social structure of a country suffering from long endemic social problems, resentment to change, political instability and absence of democracy. The bullet echoes only to cries of terror and death and reverberates with sighs of loss and grief. Nothing good comes out of violence and coercion.

To bring positive change, sectarian leaders of the Abode of Peace, claiming high democratic values, need to take up courage and open up to the world, in cooperation and equal opportunity, towards gradual transformation of their country to growth, stability and peace. Countries living in isolation of their narrow mindedness resemble a tree trunk that eventually hollows out and crumbles on itself.

Without the uniformity of a written democratic constitution, representative of all the people, despotism will continue. Lack of a mechanism for a lawful system to control power, leads Islamic regimes to absolutism and corruption.

In the Abode of Peace, Islamic law does not allow Christians, let alone Jews, to hold any high official post in the Ministry of Interior, Foreign Affairs, Defence and Justice, specifically in the legislative council, in courts and judicial branches of any Muslim government. This ban covers all the Muslim countries. Non-Muslims are not allowed to judge Muslims in their Abode of Peace States. It is against the Islamic (Shari’ah) law for a Christian or Jew to condemn a Muslim. As a rule, non-Muslims are not entrusted with any power of office that would directly or indirectly challenge a Muslim. Regardless of status, rank or social position, the Muslim in an Islamic court always comes out the winner if his accuser happens to be non-Muslim (Burns, 1994: p 87).

How just and successful a secular system becomes in an Islamic government depends mainly on how much freedom they are prepared to give the other non-Muslim aboriginal nationals, and how much they are allowed to exercise their basic human rights, equal to the rest of the Muslim citizens.

With the steady rise in fundamentalism, room for compromise is bitterly disappointing and remote (Hiro, 1989: pp 121; 178-179). The duty of the international community is to deliver the indigenous people from the clutches of such rigid and oppressive regimes by allowing them to rule themselves. They would certainly be, by far, much better off in every respect, than living under a system of fanaticism and of haphazard nature.

 

 

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Indecisiveness

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Jumping the Queue

 

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